CALENDAR

Readings and assignments are due on the day on which they are listed


Week 1: Discovering Communities

August 22: Building our team and setting expectations
  • Begin reading Sheila Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution
  • Check out this doodle map of Fitzgerald’s history, drawn by Graham Marema (Davidson ’17). Read it from the bottom up. Then try making your own map or diagram of the Russian Revolution.
August 25: Field trip
(K)no(w) Justice (K)no(w) Peace Exhibit at the Levine Museum of the New South in Charlotte
  • Please plan to capture at least one image while we are the museum. If you don’t have a camera, Dr. Churchill and Dr. Rigger are happy to take photos for you.

Week 2: Diving into Davidson

August 29: Introducing CIS 150
  • Prep page — 1-2 pages, double-spaced, Part A: Your notes on the (K)no(w) Justice, (K)no(w) Peace exhibit. Part B: Did the Charlotte protest constitute a revolution or a revolutionary moment or event? Explain why or why not, using specific evidence from the museum exhibit. Connect your argument to our first day’s discussion about revolution if you can. Bring 2 pledged copies to class.
  • Continue reading Sheila Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution
August 30: Field Trips to the Library and Your Domain

9:30: Library – a guided exploration/search for sources for artifact analysis assignment. You will need an image of the artifact you choose, so if you have a camera, please bring it to the library. If you don’t have a camera, Dr. Churchill and Dr. Rigger are happy to take photos for you.

10:30: Studio D – Discover your Domain

  • Domains Readings: Andrew Rikard, Audrey Waters, Kamo no Chomei, Virginia Woolf (you can find these readings on the WRI 101 site)
August 31, 6:00 PM: Attend the “Lenin Lives”
  • Visual Arts Center (VAC)
September 1: Digilab Learn Hypothes.is
  • Take a fieldtrip into your laptop to look at the Soviet History Archive within the online Marxist Archive (complete this exercise by Monday, September 4). You may choose an artifact from the archive for your artifact analysis. Make sure you look at the section entitled “Culture and Society.” If you would like to write about visual art or music for your artifact analysis, you will find a number of interesting artifacts there in that section.

Week 3: The Russian Revolution, Getting our Bearings

September 5: The Russian Revolution
What do we know, and what do we not know about the Russian Revolution?
  • Finish reading Sheila Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution
  • With your group, create a list of 10 items you believe should be on our timeline of the Russian Revolution. Prepare to defend your choice on Friday.
September 8: Primary Sources
What primary sources do we want to engage in depth?
  • Review the list of primary sources; think about which seem most useful, interesting, and enlivening to you
  • Hand in a draft of artifact analysis (750 words)
September 8:  DigiLab: Learn WordPress 
  • Bring your draft artifact analysis and an image for your artifact — this is what you will use to create your first post on our WordPress course website. (If you have chosen an audio or film artifact, find or create an image that can be used to illustrate it, and make sure you have a working link to the artifact.)

Week 4: Boston Trip

Our class will not meet this week, but you do have assignments:
  • Talk with your group about which events in the Russian Revolution you think should be included on a timeline.
  • Read selected primary sources

Week 5: The Russian Revolution in Primary Sources

September 19: Music & Poetry
  • Music
  • Poetry (in PDF packet sent by email)
    • Alexandr Blok, The Scythians
    • Marina Iva nova Tsetaeva,  Dis-stance: versts, miles … , Dialogue Between Hamlet and His Conscience, Poets (excerpt), Conversation with o Genius
    • Vladimir Mayakovsky, The Komsomol Song
    • Anna Akhmatova, Petrograd 1919
  • Prep page on one primary source: one paragraph of purposeful summary, one paragraph of reaction/response, two questions about the work
September 20: Project Time

Work with your group to gather materials and identify events you think should be included in the JS Timeline. Each group should limit itself to 20 slides.

  • Complete Timeline Outline by the end of the project time.
September 22: Primary Sources: Essays
  • Leo Tolstoy, “How Much Land Does a Man Need?” (1886)
  • Nicholas II, “October Manifesto” (1905)
  • Alexandra Kollontai, “Sexual Relations and the Class Struggle,” (1921)
  • Claude McKay, “Soviet Russia and the Negro
  • Prep page on one primary source: one paragraph of purposeful summary, one paragraph of reaction/response, two questions about the work
September 22:  Digilab: learn JS Timeline
  • Bring content for your slides (text, images, media) to digilab
  • Timeline Prototype 1 due by the end of the day

Week 6: “Invented Tradition” 

September 27: Savannah Trip
September 29: Continue Discussion of Primary Sources
September 30: Digilab
  • Work in teams to complete Prototype 2 of Russian Revolution Timeline

Week 7: Inventing Lenin in Art and History

October 3: Artifact Presentations
  • Prepare a 3 minute oral presentation introducing your artifact and your revised analysis
  • Hand in your revised artifact analysis
October 4: Project Time
  • Comments on Russian Revolution timelines due before Project Time (read the other 3 timelines and use the comment function to provide feedback on content and UX design)
  • Return to the VAC to look at “Lenin Lives” from our new perspective – informed by knowledge about the Russian Revolution, and equipped with the conceptual apparatus of invented tradition
  • Meet with Timeline team to discuss comments on Prototype 2 and plan revisions
October 6: Digital Tool Flea Market
  • Think about what you want you want to know or create as part of your investigation of the Meiji Restoration. Based on what you want to know or create, consider digital tools such as:
    • a Knight Lab JS Timeline
    • a Medium magazine of short articles
    • a WordPress website
    • a multimedia Scalar narrative
    • an Omeka digital archive
    • a Neatline project that allows you to chart an event across time and space.
    • an interactive Twine story or game

Russian Revolution Timelines due before you leave for break.


Week 8: FALL BREAK

Our class will not meet this week, but you do have assignments:
  • Begin reading Ian Buruma, Inventing Japan
  • Explore the library, VAC, and internet for primary sources related to the Meiji Restoration; add images/links/.pdfs to the class website

Week 9: Meiji Restoration in Text and Image

October 16: Class will not meet
  • Find an artifact in Visualizing Cultures that relates to something Buruma wrote about — the following sections are relevant: “Black Ships and Samurai,” “Yokohama Boomtown,” “Kiyochika’s Tokyo,” “Felice Beato’s Japan,” “Globetrotters’ Japan,” “Throwing Off Asia,” and “Asia Rising”
October 20: Getting a handle on the Meiji Restoration
  • finish reading Ian Buruma, Inventing Japan
  • add your primary source nominations to the Meiji Restoration page
  • Artifact analysis draft due: Include a purposeful summary of the passage in Buruma that relates to your “Visualizing Cultures” image. Consider how the artifact/image from “Visualizing Cultures” either reinforces or challenges Buruma’s argument. Be sure to include a link to the “Visualizing Cultures” image.  

Week 10: Meiji Restoration in Primary Sources

10/24: Continuity and Change in the Meiji Restoration

Primary sources

Prep page: choose one primary source and write 1-2 paragraphs comparing something Buruma says about continuity and change in the Meiji era to what the primary source suggests. Include two questions you have about the source. 

10/27: The Challenge of the West

Primary Sources

Prep page: choose one primary source and write 1-2 paragraphs comparing something Buruma says about the challenge to Japan from the West to what the primary source suggests. Include two questions you have about the source.

  • Comment on classmates’ artifact analyses (due before our 9:30 class)
10/27: DigiLab: Choose Meiji Restoration projects, form groups, and test tool or platform

Week 11: Meiji texts and artifacts

10/31: Demons, Obsession & Terror in the “New Japan”

Primary Source:

Prep page: Set in an indeterminate time and place, Akutagawa’s story reads like a legend or a ghost story. Write 1-2 paragraphs exploring how the story might be responding to cultural changes in post-Meiji Japan (aka Taisho era); include specific details and quotations, as well as 1-2 questions you have about the story.

11/3: Sharing artifact analyses
  • Revised Artifact analysis due
  • Oral presentation of revised artifact analysis (3 minutes, timed)

Week 12: Design Thinking

11/7: Design Thinking Workshop: Design your Davidson Life

with Stacy Klingbiel

  • Bring your activity logs to class
11/8: Project Time: Take action on your designs

with Stacy Klingbiel, Sundi Richard (Instructional Design), and Tiffany Waddell Tate (Office of Career Development)

11/10: Meiji Restoration projects

Digilab: Work in small groups on Meiji Restoration projects


Week 13: WASHINGTON DC TRIP

At the Sackler Museum of Asian Art, be on the lookout for artifacts that you might want to incorporate into your Meiji Restoration project.


Week 14:

November 20 (2:30-3:45):
Work on Meiji Restoration projects

Week 15: Meiji Restoration Projects

11/28: Project Workshop
  • Prototype 1 due at the beginning of class
  • Each team provides UX design feedback on other prototypes
12/1: Project Workshop
  • Prototype 2 due at the beginning of class
  • Continue to provide UX feedback and edit projects
12/5: Revolution Reflection
  • Prep Pages: give your definition of revolution & assess whether the Russian Revolution and Meiji Restoration fulfill it. Write 1-2 questions about these cultural transformations that you would like the class to discuss.
12/6: Digital Studies Showcase
  • Lilly Gallery, 3:30 – 5:30 pm
  • Final prototype due at 3:30