Health and Healthcare in Revolutionary Russia

Health and Healthcare in Revolutionary Russia

Ellie, Henry, Raven, and Lucas

Health and Healthcare Timeline

  1. Zemstvos, Healthcare and Medical Ethics, Raven
  2. Famine up to 1921, Lucas
  3. Formation of the Tuberculosis Centers, Ellie
  4. Growth of Hospitals and Medical Education, Raven
  5. Attempts to Unify, Raven
  6. The creation of the Commissariat of Public Health, Henry
  7. Nikolai Semashko, Henry
  8. Impact of Semashko System, Henry
  9. Abortion Legalized, Ellie
  10. The Povolzhye famine, Lucas
  11. Relief Efforts and Aftermath, Lucas
  12. Abortions Abolished, Ellie
  13. Bibliography

 

Works Cited

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Budnitskii, Oleg. “Zemstvo.” Encyclopedia of Russian History, edited by James R. Millar, vol. 4, Macmillan Reference USA, 2004, pp. 1721-1723. Gale Virtual Reference Library, ezproxy.lib.davidson.edu/login?url=http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=nclivedc&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CCX3404101520&asid=f6db0fc733284fe33320b33a42194b87. Accessed 19 Sept. 2017.

Chamberlin, W. H..The Russian Revolution, Volume II: 1918-1921: From the Civil War to the

Consolidation of Power. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014. Project MUSE.

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“Congress of Zemstvos (1905).” Zemstvo, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, 2001, www.encyclopediaofukraine.com/picturedisplay.asp?linkpath=pic%5CZ%5CE%5CZemstvo%2Bconvention%2B1905.jpg&page=pages%5CZ%5CE%5CZemstvo.htm&id=19326&pid=9363&tyt=Zemstvo&key=Zemstvo%2C%2B%D0%97%D0%B5%D0%BC%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B2%D0%BE.

Cunningham, Andrew, and Ole Peter Grell. Health Care and Poor Relief in 18th and 19th Century Northern Europe. Routledge, 2017, books.google.com/books?id=ZEIrDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA157&lpg=PA157&dq=russia+medicine+healthcare+19th+century&source=bl&ots=Nzs-e4rHVJ&sig=mvKSwbUlgtTfm-y7i0v3nyyuGR4&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjHkOva8q3WAhXIeSYKHQpWBOA4ChDoAQgnMAA#v=onepage&q=russia%20medicine%20healthcare%2019th%20century&f=false.

Fitzpatrick, Shelia. The Russian Revolution. Oxford University Press, 2017.

Frieden, Nancy Madelker. Russian Physicians in an Era of Reform and Revolution, 1856-1905.

Princeton University Press, 2014. Princeton Legacy Library. EBSCOhost, ezproxy.lib.davidson.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=e000xna&AN=791583&site=ehost-live.

Haines, Anna J. “Dr. N. A. Semashko.”: The Commissar of Health, Vanguard Press, 1928, www.marxists.org/archive/semashko/semashko.htm.

Henze, Charlotte E. Disease, Health Care and Government in Late Imperial Russia: Life and Death on the Volga ; 1823 – 1914. Routledge, 2011, books.google.com/books?id=03mrAgAAQBAJ&pg=PR8&lpg=PR8&dq=russia+medicine+healthcare+19th+century&source=bl&ots=Sch5KFhHpI&sig=UH6rkzU4-dMDRMAINH1j9FT8vwk&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiTpPr58K3WAhUBxiYKHeYKC7YQ6AEIXTAJ#v=onepage&q=russia%20medicine%20healthcare%2019th%20century&f=false.

Kao, Jennifer. “Famine in Russia, 1921-1922. John McCrory. John McCrory, 2017. Web. 18 September 2017.

Lebjedewa, W. “Soviet Russia Fights Abortion.” The Birth Control Review, vol. XV, no. 5, 1931, p. 137+. Nineteenth Century Collections Online, tinyurl.galegroup.com/tinyurl/5CyGo0. Accessed 19 Sept. 2017.

Lilly, David. “The Russian Famine of 1891-92.” Department of History. 1995. The Student Historical Journal. Web. 20 September 2017.

Malstev, Yuri. “What Soviet Medicine Teaches Us.” Mises Institute, 13 Aug. 2009, mises.org/library/what-soviet-medicine-teaches-us.

Newsholme, Arthur, and John Adams. Kingsbury. Red Medicine: Socialized Health in Soviet Russia. Heinemann, 1934.

Postcard: Anglo Russian Ward. Anglo Russian Hospital Lady Muriel Paget. Russia. N.d. The Women at Work Collection, Imperial War Museum, London. The Imperial War Museum, London, United Kingdom. Archives Unbound. Web. 20 Sept. 2017. <http://go.galegroup.com/gdsc/i.do?&id=GALE%7CSC5108130657&v=2.1&u=nclivedc&it=r&p=GDSC&sw=w&viewtype=Manuscript>.

Postcard: Portion Of The A.R.H. Motor Ambulance Column. Anglo Russian Hospital Lady Muriel Paget. Russia. N.d. The Women at Work Collection, Imperial War Museum, London. The Imperial War Museum, London, United Kingdom. Archives Unbound. Web. 20 Sept. 2017.  <http://go.galegroup.com/gdsc/i.do?&id=GALE%7CSC5108130658&v=2.1&u=nclivedc&it=r&p=GDSC&sw=w&viewtype=Manuscript>.

Postcard: Staff And Patients Hospital, Petrograd. Anglo Russian Hospital Lady Muriel Paget. Russia. N.d. The Women at Work Collection, Imperial War Museum, London. The Imperial War Museum, London, United Kingdom. Archives Unbound. Web. 21 Sept. 2017.  <http://go.galegroup.com/gdsc/i.do?&id=GALE%7CSC5108130664&v=2.1&u=nclivedc&it=r&p=GDSC&sw=w&viewtype=Manuscript>.

Ramer, Samuel C. “Health Care Services, Imperial.” Encyclopedia of Russian History, edited by James R. Millar, vol. 2, Macmillan Reference USA, 2004, pp. 627-629. Gale Virtual Reference Library, ezproxy.lib.davidson.edu/login?url=http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=nclivedc&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CCX3404100554&asid=d0aa0824f02733b51b09233509218008. Accessed 20 Sept. 2017.

Ransome, Arthur. Russia in 1919. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014. Print.

Rempel, David G, and Cornelia Rempel Carlson. A Mennonite Family in Tsarist Russia and the Soviet Union, 1789-1923. Toronto Ont., University of Toronto Press, 2002. EBSCOhost, http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?nobk=y&vid=2&sid=6648161f-ca1c-4545-983f-7dc909f8bc39@sessionmgr4010&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ==#db=e000xna&AN=468294.

Semashko, N. Public Health in the U.S.S.R. “Soviet News”, 1946. Archives Unbound, tinyurl.galegroup.com/tinyurl/5Cey9X. Accessed 20 Sept. 2017.

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Wexler, Barbara. “Abortion around the World.” Abortion, 2014 ed., Gale, 2014, pp. 115-127. Information Plus Reference Series. Gale Virtual Reference Library, ezproxy.lib.davidson.edu/login?url=http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=nclivedc&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CCX3780700014&asid=0840067cf4a92a84f313d336a503b03c. Accessed 20 Sept. 2017.

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Image Works Cited

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“Best World War I: Doctors, Nurses, and Wounded.” Public domain. https://i.pinimg.com/736x/d2/5e/3f/d25e3f06678c6360fefff7ae5de40348–wwi-nurses.jpg

“Congress of Zemstvos (1905).” Zemstvo, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, 2001, www.encyclopediaofukraine.com/picturedisplay.asp?linkpath=pic%5CZ%5CE%5CZemstvo%2Bconvention%2B1905.jpg&page=pages%5CZ%5CE%5CZemstvo.htm&id=19326&pid=9363&tyt=Zemstvo&key=Zemstvo%2C%2B%D0%97%D0%B5%D0%BC%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B2%D0%BE.

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Goebel, Mark “Babies In Hospital Nursery 1957 Black White Baby,” https://fineartamerica.com/featured/-babies-in-hospital-nursery-1957-black-white-baby-mark-goebel.html

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“Tuberculosis.” Remote Medicine, http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/230802-overview.

Yang, Natalie. “Pulmonary Tuberculosis,” Radiopaedia, https://radiopaedia.org/cases/pulmonary-tuberculosis-6 <p/> <p>“Zemsky Hospitals in the 19th Century.” <i>Acikgunluk</i>, AcikgunlukHealth.org, acikgunluk.net/zemskie-bolnitsy-v-19-veke/.

 

1 Comments on “Health and Healthcare in Revolutionary Russia”

  1. The strength of this timeline is its clear focus on health and healthcare, which offers a fascinating, new perspective on the RR. You do an excellent job covering health problems and health care solutions, weaving together a coherent story about Russia’s progress and pitfalls providing healthcare in tumultuous, even catastrophic times. Given our current debates about healthcare, your topic makes the distant RR seem relevant and timely to us today.

    Your writing is clear and informative, but you can work on being more concise and using more of the direct, storytelling voice that occasionally emerges. The first slide was the hardest to understand, possibly because you were trying to pack so much information in. You might do better with an introductory slide about your overall focus on healthcare in revolutionary Russia, and then go back in time and tell the story of the Zemstvos system of Tzarist Russia.

    One thing to think more about (which you touch on) is the relationship between healthcare and food distribution and access. So many of the healthcare problems you discuss seem related to famine, which seems to spring from changes not only in weather patterns but also in political and economic systems (access to abortion is also entangled in political agendas!). As we debate healthcare systems in our own country, should we also be taking into account food production & distribution/access?

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